Living in Mot; your average agricultural town?

The smell of hot whitebait sammies wafted through the air, and the sound of the amplified banjo met the ears of residents and visitors at Motueka’s weekly market.  Such a variety of goods available, one can hardly call it a ‘farmers market’; the term seems utterly out of date here where anything from Kumbucha scoby’s to organic clothing and oriental food to fermented pesto can be sampled and purchased from stallholders who know their own products and have a clear passion for their trade.

As I walk through the town, traditionally known for being an agricultural town and gateway to the enormous Abel Tasman National Park, I feel there’s a lot more to this place than meets the eye. I spent just five weeks living a short drive from the centre, and I have been both inspired and fascinated by the people that live in the Nelson region. Being a huge producing area for fruits and veggies, Motueka increases its population during the harvest months, normally being a town of 7,593 (2013 Census), this grows as Papua New Guineans, Europeans and South Americans come for picking time, drawing in a new energy to the thriving economy here.

Besides being an area boasting delicious fresh food and wine making, there are also a great many artists in the area; just a short drive along the Motueka highway and signs to galleries and craft cafés can be seen, showcasing art from pottery to paintings, wood carving and textiles and much more besides. I’ve met small communities grouping together to form organic wholesale co-operatives, creating learning workshops on unusual skills and for the first time I even saw a ‘Koha campsite’! What an encouraging and spirit warming place it has been to spend time.

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Vine growing; one of the many abundant industries of the area

Motueka, translated from the Maori, means ‘island of bush with Weka birds’ which in my experience is an appropriate name; every morning on the smallholding where I was HelpXing, I’d feed the horses their hay and throw out some kibble for the chickens when- out of nowhere- Weka birds and their young chicks would swoop in and try to get a feed! Such flighty little creatures, these birds have a soft set of feathers and can be seen all over the area; just beautiful, and so, I’m glad to say, are the people here.

Statistics and fact from: http://www.motuekaonline.org.nz/about-motueka.html